WHY MATERIAL MATTERS

NICKEL-PLATED VS BRASS

Brass Bore Jags

Solid Brass Jags are the most common type. They can do all the necessary cleaning tasks that a smart gun owner is called upon to do. Tipton's Bore Jag design keeps a tight fit between the patch and the bore for the entire length and smartly drops off as the jag exits the muzzle.

Using a brass bore jag will stop any unintentional scratches or dents to the interior of the chamber and barrel, which can do significant and costly damage. The material is soft enough to avoid rubbing if it ever comes in contact.

Brass jags are usually inexpensive, and Tipton's cost $4-5 depending on the size needed. They're threaded to match most cleaning rods and come in a good range of calibers to match nearly any gun you've got.

Nickel-Plated Bore Jags

Alternatively, nickel plating has been found to provide a pretty big advantage: Nickel-Plated Bore Jags prevent false bluing. This is an issue you can encounter with the more traditional brass jags, and is an effective way of avoiding it altogether.

Tipton's Ultra Jags feature a patented technology that covers the surface of a traditional push-type jag with solvent-proof material, keeping aggressive modern bore solvents from creating false blue stains that normally indicate copper fouling. If you're doing what you're supposed to do, running a patch through until it's completely clean, false bluing can lead to a lot of wasted time and materials.

Nickel-plated jags aren't much more costly, only about an additional dollar compared to brass jags. With some efficient research and development, Tipton's team was able to come out with an improved bore jag. It has become a go-to way of ensuring you've got a clean, well-maintained firearm.